CB1 / UPCOMING EXHIBITION Three shows for the new opening January 24th – February 28th

With thousands of square feet CB1 will open its new giant doors with three new shows. Laura Krifka’s haunting, transgressive paintings channel the Old Masters and a tiny bit of de Sade, while André Goeritz’s sculptures for wall and floor treat social anxiety with a more abstract, broke-down linearity. The revolving “guest gallery” (CB1-G) features a moving and timely group show of contemporary Islamic art.

Laura Krifka | Reap the Whirlwind

laura-krifka--exhibitionslaura-krifka-Peach-PitPeach Pit, 2014, oil on canvas, 72″ x 48″

The artist explores the subject of transgression and punishment through painting, film, sculpture and video. Reap the Whirlwind is a show wrapped in the language of seduction, beauty and the sublime, set against a backdrop of a classic American landscape. The work vacillates between a Hollywood set and neoclassical painting, often battling for dominance within a composition.

André Goeritz | schadenfreude

laura-krifka-andre-goeritz-exhibitionsandre-goeritz-Mother-Says-To-Look-Away-Mother Says To Look Away, 2015, acrylic on white carb composite, 60″ x 36.5″ x 12″

schadenfreude is the artist’s new pieces consist predominantly of wall-mounted sculptural works, which stress innate uniformity, materiality, and objective linearity. Uniform in size, each piece is made from the same template with all components cut to ensure dimensions remain the same throughout. The ground is white, surfaces are intercepted by unidirectional lines. Line direction is determined before the surface is attached to the main frame and bent. Predetermining the line’s direction ensures angles are constant after the bend visually disrupts their regularity. Bending the surface creates depth and confounds the perception of what it means to be straight.

Islamic Art | In Search of the Dot that Created the Circle: Geometry in Nature

Susana_Marin_echoesSUSANA MARIN, Echoes from Multan, 2011 Natural pigments on khadi paper, 12″ x 16.5″

The exhibition, curated by Amina Ahmed and Santiago Navila, explores how the transformative nature of geometry is used in Islamic art through the practice of both teachers and alumni of The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts, London.

search-dot-created-circle-studio To understand Islamic art, it is necessary to understand the archetypal order of nature which informs our perspectives and grants insight into that which is visible and that which is invisible. From these archetypes, we learn to navigate our way through the obscured but not unattainably hidden aspects of that which is either implicitly or explicitly rendered. The exhibition includes the work of master geometricians Dr. Keith Critchlow and Paul Marchant.

Paul-Marchant-Sttiniya-StarPAUL MARCHANT, Sttiniya Star Rendered construction drawing – Giclée print on archival paper with lightfast ink Edition of 6, unframed

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