THE GOOD LUCK GALLERY / Andy Frieder _ Outsider Art Fair NY | January 29-February 1, 2015

Andy Frieder | Outsider Art Fair NY 2015

slide_397788_4893586_freeThe Outsider Art Fair, that takes place in New York from January 29 till February 1 2015, offers the rare opportunity for artists marginalized, isolated, incarcerated, institutionalized or psychologically compromised a space to show the vibrant and singular artworks that don’t just reflect their worlds, but constitute them.

The Good Luck Gallery, the only gallery in Los Angeles to exclusively showcase self-taught art opened in March 2014, will participate at the fair showing the work of Andy Frieder (1959 – 2014).

slide_397788_4893584_freeFrieder grew up fluent in French and proficient at fencing; he was a ranked tournament player. After suffering a fencing injury, however, he turned his attention to art. During his education at art school, Frieder experienced a mental breakdown, and continued to live with symptoms of schizophrenia for much of his adult life.

slide_397788_4893580_freeAndy was open about his experiences, channeling many of his observations regarding his condition into his work, splicing together his own story with those of Greek, Roman and Biblical lore to craft visual hybrids at once personal and universal.

slide_397788_4893576_freeAndy Frieder spent his most productive years as an artist, working day and night for several decades to produce a vast body of work in a variety of mediums, but he rarely sought attention for his work; in fact he oddly avoided it. Only after his death was the full range of his output discovered. The Good Luck Gallery is representing the artist’s estate and this exhibit will focus on mixed-media paintings and drawings.

o-MAN-900o-AF-900Andy admired the work of artists from Vermeer to Basquiat, and the staff at the Lancaster Museum of Art, where Andy was a regular visitor, would gather around him to seek his opinions on art history. The museum presented a solo show of his work in 2014.

The outsider artist also left behind many written accounts expressing an acute awareness of his own work and mental state, as well as rigorous and compassionate essays on history and religion; he cared deeply about political injustice and ruminated on his work as painstakingly as any professional artist.

Maybe after enough work has  accumulated it could be presented to the public as the work of a deceased artist, but I wouldn’t necessarily die.

Lascia un commento


*